Energy

  • Fukushima Fallout: Does Nuclear Energy Still Have A Future?

    Fukushima Fallout: Does Nuclear Energy Still Have A Future?

    The fallout from the Fukushima nuclear disaster in 2011 has forced a global rethink over the future of nuclear energy. Today, some countries have outright rejected any further use of nuclear power, while others continue to pursue the energy source for economic reasons. How has the events at Fukushima affected the development of the nuclear power industry, and what is the global outlook for industry?

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  • The Increasing Threats to Global Energy Supplies – An Interview With Jellyfish

    Are Global Energy Supplies In Jeopardy? – An Interview With Jellyfish

    As global energy supplies come under increasing attack by non-state actors and private energy holdings become key targets of political maneuverings and criminal activities, Oilprice.com discusses the nature of the growing threat and how to reverse the risk with "smart power."

    To help us look at these issues we got together with corporate intelligence specialists Jellyfish Operations and security expert Jennifer Giroux.

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  • Tensions Brew In The Caspian Sea With Russia’s Latest Move

    Tensions Brew In The Caspian Sea With Russia’s Latest Move

    Since the collapse of the USSR in 1991, the nations that border the Caspian Sea – namely Russia, Iran, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan and Kazakhstan – have quarrelled over how to properly divide its waters. With as much as 250 billion barrels of recoverable oil, 200 billion barrels of potential reserves and 9.2 trillion cubic meters of recoverable natural gas, at stake, tensions have risen over recent moves by Russia to develop its offshore resources.

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  • Nuclear Power

    Barely A Year After Fukushima, IEA Says: Embrace Nuclear

    The latest report from the IEA is not going to please environmentalists. Accordingly, the IEA admonishes governments for not fully embracing renewable energies – including nuclear energy. But to be fair, there is a desperate need to focus on nuclear power if we are to meet growing energy demand. The only question then that remains is whether governments have the cash and political will to consider embracing nuclear.

    The good news is that on 8 November the International Energy Agency released its 2011 "World Energy Outlook."

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  • Fracking Hell: Hydraulic Fracturing Confirmed As Cause For Increased Earthquakes

    Fracking Hell: Hydraulic Fracturing Confirmed As Cause For Increased Earthquakes In US

    Hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” as it is otherwise known, is the process by which pressurized water is used to fracture rock layers thus releasing petroleum, natural gas, or other substances so that they can be extracted. But while oil and gas companies have taken out very expensive media campaigns to promote the benefits of the technology, genuine concerns have emerged over its environmental and ecological impact.

    On 5 November an earthquake measuring 5.6 rattled Oklahoma and was felt as far away as Illinois.

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  • Egypt’s New Wind of Change

    Egypt’s New Wind of Change

    Wind power may currently only contribute to less than 1 percent of Egypt’s energy output, but most experts believe that it has the potential to meet the nation’s energy needs. The largest bottleneck thus far to expanding Egypt’s wind power facilities, though, has been in securing funding for the development. But with the overthrow of the Mubarak government coupled with newer, and more ambitious plans for the industry, there is renewed optimism for a wind-powered revival in the country.

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