US Tax Rates (USA Income Tax Rate)

October 13, 2010US Taxby EconomyWatch

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Latest reports on US tax rates have confirmed that Tom Bakk who functions as chairman of Senate Taxes in USA has recommended various types and amount of raises in taxes in order to generate fresh tax revenue worth $2 billion. He has proposed that there should be increase in USA income tax rate across various areas.

Tom Bakk has also suggested in favor of alterations in some other tax rates of US such as introducing a sales tax for transactions made on internet as well as downloading music on same. Bakk has also reiterated that some new tax rates in US would be introduced pretty soon and that would be inclusive of income taxes that would be levied on financially well off people of America.

According to reports on tax rates at US governor of Lansing, Governor Jennifer Granholm has decided in favor of a graduated income tax scheme. This plan would be replacing a surcharge that is levied on major business sectors of this state.

Graduated US tax rates are already in operation in a number of states over there. 36 out of 43 states where income taxes are in operation have graduated US tax rates. US tax rates in these states vary from 6 to 9 percent. As per a graduated tax rates structure almost 70 percent of tax payers would be needed to pay lesser taxes compared to 30 percent tax payers within that same geographical area where this tax structure is being imposed.


Graduated US tax rates are in operation at Kansas as well. Here highest rate of income tax is 6.45 percent, which is applicable for taxable earnings worth $60,000 and more. However, it is also being noted that these regulations would be adding to confusion of voters.

Economists have said that small business enterprises are in need of breaks as far as US tax rates are concerned. These new tax rates would greatly increase importance of book keepers as tax payers would need to figure implications of same. As of 2009 US tax rates for income taxes have been varying from 10 percent to 35 percent. Maximum taxes are imposed on heads of individual families.



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