Anonymous Tsunami Donor Leaves 10 Million Yen In Public Loo

By: EW News Desk Team   Date: 30 September 2011

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30 September 2011

 A mystery donor has left a bag filled with 10 bundles of a hundred 10,000 yen notes in a public restroom, with clear instructions that it should be used to help victims of the horrific March earthquake and tsunami.

According to the AFP, a Sakado city official reported that a plastic shopping bag was used to store the donation of 10 million yen (US$131,000) in a public restroom for the disabled. Attached to the money included a handwritten note with the message: "I am all alone, I have no future so let the people of Tohoku use it.

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Tohoku is the country's northeast region that was ravaged by a massive 9.0 magnitude earthquake on March 11 that triggered a deadly tsunami that killed more than 20,000 people and displaced thousands of people. The impact of the disasters also sparked the world's worst nuclear emergency since Chernobyl at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 

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The BBC's Roland Buerk in Tokyo says that the earthquake and tsunami has brought out striking examples of generosity and honesty. The equivalent of $50 million in cash has since been recovered from the disaster area and handed over to the police. Another $30 million was recovered from safes found in the rubble. 

This is also not the first time that anonymous benefactors in Japan have left money in toilets. In 2007, 400 envelopes containing 10,000 yen notes were found in public restrooms of local council buildings all across the country. 

Sakado spokeswoman Masumi Sekiguchi said that the money would be handed over to the Japanese Red Cross if the money is not reclaimed within three months.

Related: New Morn or False Dawn? Japan's Rare Opportunity For Change: Heizo Takenaka 

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